Video  |  July 21, 2022

Decarbonizing corporate cash: Drawdown-aligned business, investments & fnance

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Nicholas Doherty | Unsplash

 

This webinar provides an overview of Scope 3 financed emissions and key findings from the recent Carbon Bankroll report before offering short- and long-term strategies for folks working in corporate finance and sustainability to reduce the carbon footprint of the company's cash and investments. The format is a short presentation, panel discussion, and then summary of key actions. This webinar is Part 2 of a two-part series on Drawdown-Aligned Business, Investments and Finance. Part 1, on Greening 401(k)s, is available here.

Speakers:

Paul Moinester is executive director and co-founder of The Outdoor Policy, an innovation hub that specializes in developing breakthrough solutions designed for seismic impact. As TOPO’s executive director, Paul has established TOPO as a leader in the responsible finance space and is spearheading numerous finance initiatives, including The Carbon Bankroll report and related initiatives and a first-of-its-kind global banking certification program that evaluates and rates financial firms’ social and environmental impact.

James Vaccaro is executive director of Climate Safe Lending Network, an international multi-stakeholder collaborative dedicated to accelerating the decarbonization of the banking sector to secure a climate-safe world. James has over 20 years senior management experience in sustainable banking and investment. He has served as a member of several advisory groups on sustainable finance at UK, European, and international levels and is author of several reports and papers on sustainable finance and impact investing.

Vanessa Fajans-Turner is executive director of BankFWD, a Founding Principal with Investable Oceans, and an advisor to the City of Ithaca’s Green New Deal. She was previously SDG financing director for the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network, associate director for James Cameron’s Avatar Alliance Foundation, and a producer for Seasons 1 and 2 of National Geographic’s Emmy Award-winning documentary series, Years of Living Dangerously. She is currently a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and Venture Partners for Hatziememos Libby, as well as a CNN Opinion contributor, siting on the advisory boards of The Resolution Project, William, Jeff and Jennifer Gross Family Foundation, and Amazon Watch. She has an MA from Johns Hopkins-SAIS and a BA from Harvard

Charlie Bischoff leads the corporate treasury function for Patagonia, handling all aspects of cash management, liquid investments, cash forecasting, corporate hedging and banking. He has helped build and execute the company’s sustainable finance strategy, which aims to align Patagonia’s global finances and financial partners with its mission, “We’re in business to save our home plant.” Charlie has worked in corporate treasury for 10 years across a variety of industries, including outdoor apparel, consumer packaged goods, and banking. He holds a BA in Economics from the University of Vermont, and enjoys fly fishing and running in his spare time.

Patrick Flynn is senior vice president and global head of sustainability for Salesforce, the global leader in customer relationship management, where he defines and leads the execution of Salesforce’s environmental strategy. He helps the company use its full power for the planet, addressing the climate crisis to reach the shared goal of a just transition to a 1.5° future as quickly as possible.

Press Contacts

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